Press

Scott, Tony, John, and Robert record vocals for The Trim Reaper.  (c. 2006)

Scott, Tony, John, and Robert record vocals for The Trim Reaper. (c. 2006)

All Music Guide
Jonathan Widran
“This Illinois raised, L.A. based guitarist’s bluesy, blistering improvisational style reflects all the influences he has been favorably compared to including Al DiMiola and John McLaughlin along with his own personal hard rock heroes Van Halen and AC/DC. This short but hardly sweet (and intensely raucous) collection is a unique indie find in an industry that caters too often these days to convention and simplicity but its audience will most likely be guitar students who gape at how hard and fearlessly he rocks, and at just how much can be achieved by throwing off the restraints. His oddball titles say it all about his daring and adventure (the locomotive Grain Auger Amputee,” the only slightly more restrained but heavily percussive Chickens and Bitches (This is Jazz Farm)”) and when he says Eff-You” to the play it safers, he does so with colorful panache and lots of notes and energy. It’s not exactly jazz more like crazy fusion traveling the heavy metal highway and to prove that, he includes the fiery vocal Manure Spreader” that features hardcore guitar throughout. In both his attitude and his playing, Farr tends towards the gleefully obnoxious, but few who listen will forget their trip to the farm anytime soon.”

LA Weekly
Greg Burk
“Scott Farr of Jazz Farm plays guitar like you wished you could when you were a kid – blazing on a nasty-toned Les Paul, blues leaking from his shoes, crackling with the excess energy of youth and uncoolness. The presence of John Wood’s organ may raise flashes of some old Tony Williams trio with Larry Young and John McLaughlin, except Farr’s fire is all in the ‘nads. The Illinois plowboy sometimes even indulges in a typically unrestrained howl: “I can’t rock so I stroke my own cock/Jangle my guitar and make fun of Scott Farr.”

Ear Candy Mag
Scott H. Platt
Scott Farr,”Jazz Farm” (Banana Bread Records)
The title, JAZZ FARM made me think of Spinal Tap’s “Sex Farm” and really made me giggle. Then there is the hilarious CD cover with a Hindu-like Scott Farr in the middle of a field, that really didn’t prepare me for the sounds within – Captain Beefheart meets Jeff Beck in a jazz/rock fusion! With most of the songs being instrumentals, this CD is basically an excuse to show off Scott’s red hot guitar licks – and in this case, it ain’t a bad thing. Bonus points for originality and a breath of fresh air.

PopMatters
Tim O’Neil
Scott Farr, Jazz Farm (Banana Bread)
Every once in a great while a guitarist comes along who plays so well that he knocks you on your ass. Sure enough, Scott Farr is such a guitarist. This album may ostensibly be jazz, but it rocks about as hard as you can possibly rock without being named Lemmy. Fusion is tricky business, and Farr plays the type of fusion that John Zorn would play if John Zorn had grown up listening to Van Halen. Farr has put together a strong ensemble to compliment his heavy riffing, but I’ll be honest and admit I don’t recognize a single one of them. They all play well, but this is Farr’s spotlight. This guy probably sleeps with his guitar cradled in his arms, and I’d be willing to bet that he plays jazz scales in his sleep. But for all his technique, he never looses sight of the fact that sometimes there is nothing more profound than a fuzzy power chord. Jazz Farm is barely 25 minutes long but that doesn’t stop it from sporting more per-capita rock than most CDs released this decade.

Keith “MuzikMan” Hannaleck
“The cacophonous introduction to Scott Farr CD Jazz Farm has you scratching your head for a few minutes before everything settles in on the crazed opener “Grain Auger Amputee.” As the music relates to the “farm” and all its wonderful equipment and how you can turn your body parts into hamburger, the music itself takes a little trip through a mixing bowl. This is the weirdest it gets for the entire CD and then it just seems to get better with each song. “Eff-Yoo” gets a little more civilized with sharp blues and jazz licks from Farr six-string, accompanied by the always-wonderful sounding Hammond B3 Organ. “Chicken & Bitches” starts you off with an intro regarding performing oral sex on oneself with a complex set of ropes and so forth, however disgusting that may be, the guitar work just rocks and you quickly forget those comments, which were surely not meant for any deep thought, the focus here is the music. Farr is one serious dude when it comes to his music. This is air guitar stuff (don¡¦t do this while driving) for all of you guys out there that practice that on a daily basis, and no, I am not going to admit if I do that. “King Anhydrous” takes you to a land far away; it is yet another example of this man¡¦s ability to change guitar sounds and textures like the many faces of silent film star Lon Chaney. “Manure Spreader” is a vocal/guitar work out; the song actually reminded me of the character in the Movie School of Rock. Even when he is just kidding around and singing a crazy song like that, Farr plays some seriously rockin’ guitar.”
Well, you gotta “Love This Life” when you have fun music like this to listen to.

J-Sin
“I’m not sure that this album didn’t once sport the title of Funny Farm¡¨ for when it opens with the cacophony of orchestrated chaos one could easily assume that someone’s meds were forgotten before pressing record. Scott Farr never takes himself to seriously and when I read a rant on the web after searching for him about vintage jean jackets where he states and boy do I quote Isn’t that what vintage or worn’ clothing exudes, experience? It’s like getting experience without having the actual experience. Play punk, get tattooed, sing with a whiney bitch accent about your first date and then sell to the kids. Sell to kids a product that looks experienced, but which has no actual experience attached to it.  I mean whoa. So when I hear lunatic songs like Oh, Hey Staci, Hey Scott, Yeah You Maybe Wanna Hang Out This Saturday Night, No I Don’t Think So, Uh, Ok” and Chickens and Bitches,” Eff-Yoo¡¨, and Manure Spreader¨I realize that there’s no chance I’m going to ever let anyone borrow this album it’s too damn good to be out of your hands for a mere minute. The chaotic jazz rock fusion of furious insanity could only properly be compared to something that Zorn would come up or Mr. Bungle but without the screaming.”

NY Rock Street
Scott Farr, Jazz Farm (c 2003 Scott Farr)
It’s not until the third track on this disc that Jazz Farm starts to sound jazzy. And it’s not jazz in the traditional sense (in case you’re thinking standards, a smoky room, a saxophone), but jazz in the sense of improvisation. And what’s jazz without improv? Yet given this, the disc definitely leans toward rock (and quite heavily at that), or I guess you could say a rock record that leans toward jazz (albeit lightly). You could call it fusion, and there are elements, as on “Chickens and Bitches,” which harken back to fusion’s heyday in the late ’70s. But also at work here is a sense of humor, evident from the artwork, and from his website, www.scottfarr.com. The humor takes the material away from the more scholarly, technically able and musically trained approach that fusion often sports. This isn’t to say Farr can’t play he can. And can rip like a chainsaw if needed, on a Les Paul no less. It’s just you get the feeling the guy is a normal, goofy guy, who can play like crazy, and does, without an ego or feeling competitive with other musicians. And for a jazz disc, the songs are surprisingly short and sweet no extended solos, no endless choruses, everything tightly packed, waiting to fire. A very interesting disc.

IMPACT Press
Scott Farr Jazz Farm
Banana Bread Records
Only a jazz musician who is a fan of AC/DC and Van Halen can play jazz music like this. His electric guitar roars though these 25 minutes of music that sounds improvised at times. My only complaint is that it doesn’t go on longer. (AL)

“Off kilter speed jazz blended in a nebula of genre fucking kryptonite meant to piss you off, or better yet, wake you up!! Welcome to the Farm…MOU-HAHAHAHAHA!!!”
 

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